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Course Details

Course Details

Course Code: PBHE605 Course ID: 2838 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

This course is a study of the theoretical, historical, and contemporary issues associated with quarantine as a public health and safety measure. Students will learn of quarantine strategy, implementation, effectiveness, and debate. The course topics will include consideration of quarantine as a health and safety measure in the modern homeland security strategy.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
11/30/20 - 04/30/21 05/03/21 - 06/27/21 Spring 2021 Session I 8 Week session
12/28/20 - 06/04/21 06/07/21 - 08/01/21 Spring 2021 Session D 8 Week session
01/25/21 - 07/02/21 07/05/21 - 08/29/21 Summer 2021 Session B 8 Week session
02/22/21 - 07/30/21 08/02/21 - 09/26/21 Summer 2021 Session I 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

  • CO-1 - Assess how effective control of communicable disease is determined by disease attributes, infrastructure, and location.
  • CO-2 - Discern the historical use of quarantine and isolation other related control measures compared to current practices and the factors that prompted change.
  • CO-3 - Determine response to infectious disease during humanitarian emergencies including surveillance and control.
  • CO-4 - Appraise epidemics and pandemics that have raised national and international concern and the control measures used.
  • CO-5 – Evaluate the ethics of public health interventions including quarantine.
  • CO-6 - Investigate outbreaks of selected infectious agents of public health concern and response.

Discussions:

Please join the Discussion each week. Replies must be posted in the week due and replies after the end of the each week will not be graded or receive credit. The discussions are for student interaction and input and must be submitted before the week ends in order to receive full credit. Students should demonstrate their own knowledge in the discussions and avoid copying and pasting from websites. The Rubric is attached to discussion description.

Guidelines:

Initial Response:

  • Post your initial response to each discussion by 11:55pm, ET, Wednesday.
  • Initial responses should have substance where students explore, explain, and expand upon issues being discussed, and apply relevant course materials.
  • Students should analyze course concepts, theories or materials correctly, using examples or supporting evidence.
  • Initial responses should be supported by at least two references (APA referencing format is not required for discussions)

Peer Responses:

  • For each discussion, reply to at least 2 of your classmates by 11:55pm, ET, Sunday.
  • Students are required to respond to at least two (2) other student’s initial postings (and the instructor) with significant comments that have substance.
  • Students should collaborate with fellow learners, relating the discussion to course concepts, add several innovative ideas, and provide considerable additional insight that relates to core concepts.
  • Peer responses should include at least two (2) of the following components: Offering advice; posing a question; providing an alternative point-of-view; and acknowledging similar experiences.
  • Peer responses should be supported by at least one reference (APA referencing format is not required for discussions)
  • All discussions can be accessed in the discussion section of the course.
  • A Discussion rubric is included in the discussion section of the course
  • More in-depth specific instructions for each discussion can be found in the discussion tab within the course.
  • Late Discussion posts receive a 10% per day late penalty. If your 2 peer responses are posted after the week is ended (after Day 7, Sunday) they receive a zero, and that the discussion is finished. You cannot receive credit for participation in a discussion with others after the discussion week has closed.
  • If there are less than 3 students in the course, only one (1) peer posting will be required. Your peer postings should challenge or expound upon at least one of the points made by your peer, and “I agree” does not constitute as an adequate response. As graduate students, you will be expected to provide comprehensive, relevant and well supported points in your assignments.

We all bring something unique to the classroom, from our understanding, our experiences, and our value systems. We honor and respect each person’s diverse beliefs to help us see beyond the classroom to be the most effective individuals we can be. Therefore, we should all be respectful of others while expressing our viewpoints and opinions. Proper Netiquette behavior is expected. Any inflammatory, demeaning or disrespectful language in a posting will be immediately removed from the discussion space.

Assignments

There will be three case studies due during the course due during week 4, 6, and 8. All assignments should follow proper APA format and include all information given in the Assignment Instructions. All assignments must be submitted through the link in the classroom and must receive a TurnItIn score before being graded. Assignments that are not in proper format may not be read by TurnItIn. It is your responsibility to make sure your submission receives a score. If the score is above 20%, this indicates plagiarism. A submission with a high TurnItIn score should be rewritten and resubmitted prior to the due date.

  • More in-depth specific instructions for each assignment can be found in the Assignment tab within the course.
  • Assignments submitted late without advance notice will receive a 5% per day late penalty and will not be accepted for grading five (5) days past the due date.
  • Refer to the Lessons and Resources sections in the classroom for information about all readings in this course.
  • Each week’s Lesson contains all the material for the week.
  • For most weeks, course readings are a mix of professional sources (such as peer-reviewed journal articles and governmental publications) and “popular” sources, such as newspaper articles, professional magazine articles, and websites intended for the public. All required course readings are freely downloadable from the course website or from other websites.
Book Title:Communicable Disease Control in Emergencies: A Field Manual - free pdf available at http://whqlibdoc.who.int/publications/2005/9241546166_eng.pdf
ISBN:9789241546164
Author:Connolly, M.A.
Unit Cost:$49.40
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.*
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.