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LSTD304 - Military Law

Course Details

Course Code: LSTD304 Course ID: 3446 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course is designed to provide students with a solid knowledge of US Military Law through the study of the evolutionary process, politics, and motivation that has led to the current status of US Military Law. Topics include the history of military law, US Military Law, statutory basis, legal system, and basic application. It will also include an analysis of current events as related through the press, where military law is involved.





Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
12/31/18 - 05/31/19 06/03/19 - 07/28/19 Spring 2019 Session D 8 Week session
02/25/19 - 08/02/19 08/05/19 - 09/29/19 Summer 2019 Session I 8 Week session
04/29/19 - 10/04/19 10/07/19 - 12/01/19 Fall 2019 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

LO 1: Identify and describe the major differences between a military court-martial and a civilian

criminal trial.

LO 2: Analyze the development of military law.

LO 3: Explain the military justice process.

LO 4: Explain the rights of military members.

LO 5: Identify and describe the Constitutional safeguards associated with military justice.

LO 6: Explain the discharge procedures and outcomes within the administrative separation

process.

LO 7: Describe the courts-martial process.

LO 8: Analyze major court rulings regarding military tribunals and the rights of terrorists.

The grading will be based on forum participation, two writing assignments, a midterm examination, and a final examination.

1. Introduction Forum: (1%) During week 1, students introduce themselves to the class and explain their goals of taking the course. Students also respond to other student’s introductions.

2. Forum Participation: (35%) Forum assignments allow students maximum flexibility for interaction and exchange with fellow students and the instructor. The forum questions will be related to the reading assignments and/or Case Studies. Each week, your initial post is due by Wednesday. You should then respond to three (3) or more posts by Sunday. This can be accomplished by

· Validating with additional evidence from the literature.

· Posing a thoughtful question with commentary which generates further discussion.

· Providing an alternative point-of-view, with evidence and examples.

· Offering additional insight into how the concept might be understood, with evidence provided with real world examples.

You are expected to be active in the classroom throughout the week and actively engaged in the back-and-forth discussion between your colleagues and the professor.

3. Writing Assignments: (20%) The writing assignments enable students to analyze court cases and/or current topics of military justice.

4. Midterm Examination: (20%) The midterm examination will be open sources, non-proctored essay questions.

5. Final Examination: (24%) The final examination will be open sources, non-proctored essay questions.

NameGrade %
Midterm Examination 20.00 %
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Links provided inside the classroom in the Lessons section.
Author: No Author Specified

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.