Skip Navigation
 

Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: IRLS631 Course ID: 3483 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

An examination of the governments and the militaries of the two Koreas. This course will closely examine the reasons behind the Korean peninsula playing such a pivotal role in overall Northeast Asian security. The course will examine domestic political, economic and social problems and prospects of North Korea and South Korea; the prospects for reunification; the military balance and the changing strategic environment; and the relations of Pyongyang and Seoul with their key allies. Includes an examination of U.S. relations with Korea.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1: Summarize and appraise historical setting of Korea

CO-2: Analyze and criticize political developments in Korea

CO-3: Evaluate and discuss the nuclear armament issue of DPRK

CO-4: Research, construct, and present a persuasive written analysis on topics relevant to the Korean politics.

These course objectives harmonize with the Degree Program Objectives, which require graduates to:

  • Construct and criticize the theory and politics of conflict, war, diplomatic relations, and the evolving nature of the international system.
  • Provide students with a research-active teaching environment to provide grounding in the study of international relations including its political, social, and economic aspects.
  • Assess how state, non-state, and supra-national actors behave and interact through a dynamic appreciation of different levels of analysis.
  • Critique the theories of international relations, the heritage and development of the discipline, its major debates, its inherent nature as an interdisciplinary study, and a critical appreciation of the essentially contested nature of politics in general, and international relations in particular.
  • Evaluate the nature and distribution of power in the international systems, the problems of political order and the social economic, historical and cultural context within which international actors operate.
  • Assess the current challenges to international order, cooperation, identity, social formations, and global issues, and possible strategies to address them.
  • Evaluate the changing role of the state in the context of globalization and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security.
NameGrade %
Discussions 30.00 %
W1: The History of Korea 5.00 %
W2: The Korean War 5.00 %
W4: Democratization 5.00 %
W5: North Korean Leadership 5.00 %
W6: The Nuclear Situation 5.00 %
W7: The Question of Re-Unification 5.00 %
Week 3 Research Proposal 30.00 %
Week 3 Research Proposal 30.00 %
Final Research Paper 40.00 %
Week 8 Final Paper 40.00 %

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1: Summarize and appraise historical setting of Korea

CO-2: Analyze and criticize political developments in Korea

CO-3: Evaluate and discuss the nuclear armament issue of DPRK

CO-4: Research, construct, and present a persuasive written analysis on topics relevant to the Korean politics.

These course objectives harmonize with the Degree Program Objectives, which require graduates to:

  • Construct and criticize the theory and politics of conflict, war, diplomatic relations, and the evolving nature of the international system.
  • Provide students with a research-active teaching environment to provide grounding in the study of international relations including its political, social, and economic aspects.
  • Assess how state, non-state, and supra-national actors behave and interact through a dynamic appreciation of different levels of analysis.
  • Critique the theories of international relations, the heritage and development of the discipline, its major debates, its inherent nature as an interdisciplinary study, and a critical appreciation of the essentially contested nature of politics in general, and international relations in particular.
  • Evaluate the nature and distribution of power in the international systems, the problems of political order and the social economic, historical and cultural context within which international actors operate.
  • Assess the current challenges to international order, cooperation, identity, social formations, and global issues, and possible strategies to address them.
  • Evaluate the changing role of the state in the context of globalization and regional integration and the implications for international peace and security.
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.