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IRLS405 - National and Transnational Justice

Course Details

Course Code: IRLS405 Course ID: 4005 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course provides an overview of many transitional and transnational justice approaches. Beginning with Nuremberg through to the International Criminal Courts, students will gain a thorough understanding of the global justice endeavors and their connection to human security.





Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
04/29/19 - 10/04/19 10/07/19 - 12/01/19 Fall 2019 Session B 8 Week session
06/24/19 - 11/29/19 12/02/19 - 01/26/20 Fall 2019 Session D 8 Week session
08/26/19 - 01/31/20 02/03/20 - 03/29/20 Winter 2020 Session I 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1: Analyze the role of justice in transitional processes.

CO-2: Compare and contrast contemporary approaches to transitional and transnational justice.

CO-3: Appraise transitional justice within the confines of criminal tribunals, truth and reconciliation commissions (TRCs), vetting processes, restitution schemes, and indigenous justice experiments.

CO-4: Examine the political challenges of implementing international criminal law in the domestic context.

CO-5: Assess the impact of limited jurisdiction, security, timing, and resources on the enforcement of transnational/transitional justice.

Forum discussions – 25 percent

Each week, a discussion question is provided and posts should reflect an assimilation of the readings. Students are required to provide a substantive initial post by Thursday at 11:55 pm ET and respond to more than 2 classmates by Sunday at 11:55 pm ET. Forum posts are graded on timeliness, relevance, knowledge of the weekly readings, and the quality of original ideas. A forum discussion rubric is located with each week’s discussion in classroom.

Midterm assignment - 25 percent

This assignment is an essay of 2 questions, 3 pages each, to test knowledge and assimilation of the course objectives. The exclusive use of required texts and readings from this course is mandatory.

Progress assignment - 25 percent

Specialized Exercise. 8-10 pages including research and analysis.

Final assignment – 25 percent

This assignment is an essay of 2 questions, 3 pages each, to test knowledge and assimilation of the course objectives. The exclusive use of required texts and readings from this course is mandatory.

NameGrade %
Forum Discussions 25.00 %
Week 1 3.13 %
Week 2 3.13 %
Week 3 3.13 %
Week 4 3.13 %
Week 5 3.13 %
Week 6 3.13 %
Week 7 3.13 %
Week 8 3.13 %
Midterm Assignment 25.00 %
Week 3 - Midterm Assignment 25.00 %
Progress Assignment 25.00 %
Week 6 - Progress Assignment 25.00 %
Final Assignment 25.00 %
Week 8 - Final Assignment 25.00 %
  • Required Course Textbooks

The required texts for this course are: (available as ebooks in the classroom)

Anders, Gerhard, and Zenker, Olaf. 2014. Development and Change Special Issues: Transition and Justice : Negotiating the Terms of New Beginnings in Africa. Somerset, NJ, USA: Wiley.

Battersby, Paul, Joseph M. Siracusa, and Sasho Ripiloski. 2011. Crime Wars. Westport, CT:Praeger (Chapter 6.)

Jackson, Donald W. et al. eds. 2010. Globalizing Justice : Critical Perspectives on Transnational Law and the Cross-Border Migration of Legal Norms New York: SUNY Press.

Sands, Philippe. 2003. From Nuremberg to The Hague : The Future of International Criminal Justice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chapters 1 and 2 only.)

Simpson, Kirk. 2009. Truth Recovery in Northern Ireland: Critically Interpreting the Past Manchester, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • External websites and other assigned reading found in the Lessons area of the classroom.

  • Weekly Lesson Notes and videos or audio files are found in the Lessons area of the classroom.
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
Author: No Author Specified

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.