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IRLS310 - Introduction to Human Security

Course Details

Course Code: IRLS310 Course ID: 3999 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course introduces students to the international relations subfield of human security. A broad overview of the security issues affecting humans, their communities, and as a result global stability are the focus of this course.





Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/24/19 - 11/29/19 12/02/19 - 01/26/20 Fall 2019 Session D 8 Week session
08/26/19 - 01/31/20 02/03/20 - 03/29/20 Winter 2020 Session I 8 Week session
10/28/19 - 04/03/20 04/06/20 - 05/31/20 Spring 2020 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO- 1 Describe the role of rapid globalization in changing perceptions of security

CO – 2 Identify key threats to human security

CO – 3 Compare and contrast traditional international relations approaches to security with the doctrine of human security

CO – 4 Examine the various initiatives developed by states, non-state actors, and intergovernmental organizations to enhance human security

CO – 5 Apply the concepts of human security

These course objectives harmonize with the Degree Program Objectives, which require graduates to:

  • Compare and contrast the political, economic, and military components of foreign policy decision making and analyze the impact of foreign policy on domestic decisions.
  • Draw conclusions about the implications of foreign policy as it is currently applied to various regions of the world.
  • Evaluate the "national interest" and how it is formulated, assess alternatives to current policies, and examine their likely impact on the United States, its allies, and other nations.
  • Examine the theory, nature, and causes of war and their relationship to diplomacy; assess the contributions of diplomacy to accomplishment of war objectives.
  • Critically assess the unique principles, structure, and organization of the major international organizations.
  • Examine the prospects of governance by international organizations.
  • Assess the economic and political processes in international development; diagnose social issues in international development; appraise the need for sustainable international development.
  • Evaluate the multidimensional effects of globalization.
NameGrade %
Forum Discussion 25.00 %
Week 1 Forum 3.13 %
Week 2 Forum 3.13 %
Week 3 Forum 3.13 %
Week 4 Forum 3.13 %
Week 5 Forum 3.13 %
Week 6 Forum 3.13 %
Week 7 Forum 3.13 %
Week 8 Forum 3.13 %
Assignments 25.00 %
Week 3 - Research Plan for Final Assignment 12.50 %
Week 6 - Research Outline 12.50 %
Midterm Assignment 25.00 %
Week 4 - Midterm Essay 25.00 %
Final Assignment 25.00 %
Week 8 Final Research Project 25.00 %

Required Course Textbooks

Various resources from the APUS Library are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve

Required Readings

Required Readings

Week 1

  • Alexandra Amouyel, “What is Human Security?,” Human Security Journal.
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security” Chapter 1
  • Week 1 Lesson Notes

Week 2

  • Bora, Saswati, Iride Ceccacci, Christopher Delgado, and Robert Townsend. "Food and Security Conflict."
  • Carolan, Michael. "The Food and Human Security Index: Rethinking Food Security and ‘Growth’."
  • Lander, Max. "School Garden Programs and Food Security | Pulitzer Center."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 3
  • Week 2 Lesson Notes

Week 3

  • Kettemann, Matthew . "The Conceptual Debate on Human Security and its Relevance for the Development of International Law."
  • "Migrants in Times of Crisis: An Emerging Protection Challenge." Interantional Peace Institute.
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 2
  • Walt, Stephen. "A grand new strategy for American Foreign Policy."
  • Week 3 Lesson Notes which includes Mary Kaldor’s response to Stephen Walt.

Week 4

  • "Human Security, Climate Change and Environmentally Induced Migration." Institute for Environment and Human Security.
  • Tipson, Frederick. "Natural Disasters as Threats to Peace."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 4
  • Week 4 Lesson Notes

Week 5

  • "Country Profile: Cuba." Library of Congress - Federal Research Division.
  • Ethan Kapstein and Kamma Kathuria “Economic Assistance in Conflict Zones: Lessons From Afghanistan”
  • Moreno, Alejandro, and Daniel Calingaert. "Change Comes to Cuba: Citizens’ Views on Reform after the Sixth Party Congress."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 5
  • Week 5 Lesson Notes

Week 6

  • Hughes, Donna, Katherine Chon, and Derek Ellerman. 2007. Modern-day comfort women: the U.S. military, transnational crime, and the trafficking of women. Violence Against Women: 901-922
  • Krieg, Sarah H. 2009. Trafficking in human beings: the EU approach between border control, law enforcement and human rights.
  • Sussman, Anna Louise. "The Brothel Next Door."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 6
  • "United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime." Comprehensive Strategy to Combat Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants.”
  • Week 6 Lesson Notes

Week 7

  • Carlton, Sally. "Human Security in Nepal: Where to Now?" In Human security in Nepal: concepts, issues and challenges, 279-292.
  • Cohen, Michael, Maria Figueroa, and Parag Khanna. "The New Colonialists."
  • Hetherington, M. J. and Husser, J. A. (2012), How Trust Matters: The Changing Political Relevance of Political Trust, 312–325.
  • Human Security Centre, Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia and the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. "Why the Dramatic Decline in Armed Conflict?"
  • Human Security Centre, Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia and the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. "Counting the Indirect Costs of War"
  • Ricks, Thomas. "The real scandal of Benghazi is the plodding caution of U.S. military leaders."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 7
  • Week 7 Lesson Notes

Week 8

  • Gittleman, Andrea, and Mark Lagon. "Combating Gender-Based Violence as a U.S. Policy Priority.”
  • Human Security Centre, Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia and the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. "Trends in Human Insecurity”
  • Human Security Centre, Liu Institute for Global Issues, University of British Columbia and the School for International Studies, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. "Assault on the Vulnerable.”
  • Kant, Immanuel. "Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch."
  • Schirch, Lisa. "From Protection of Civilians to Human Security: Comparing and Contrasting Principles, Distinctions and Institutionalization."
  • United Nations, “Final Report of the Commission on Human Security.” Chapter 8
  • Week 8 Lesson Notes

Students are also expected to follow international affairs by regularly accessing reputable media sources with significant foreign policy content, such as TV newscasts (Newshour (PBS), CNN WorldView/The World Today, C-Span, ABC News, ABC Nightline, CBS News, NBC News), radio (National Public Radio), newspapers (New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Wall Street Journal), news services (AP, Reuters) and/or news magazines (Time, Newsweek, The Economist).

Additional Resources and Web Sites are found in the classroom.

Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
Author: No Author Specified

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.