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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HLSS498 Course ID: 3000 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This senior capstone course allows students majoring in homeland security to analyze specific program related issues and problems using the knowledge and understanding gained by completing the required courses in the program and a significant number of the major courses. Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 106 hours towards your program.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
03/29/2022 - 09/02/2022 09/05/2022 - 10/30/2022 September Summer 2022 Session D 8 Week session
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
05/21/2022 - 11/04/2022 11/07/2022 - 01/01/2023 November Fall 2022 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1: Examine the historical and evolving concept of homeland security within the broader political and national security system of the contemporary nation-state.
CO-2: Recognize the detailed mitigation, planning, response, and recovery phases to and from a homeland security incident.
CO-3: Differentiate among the various homeland security threats, to include those that are manmade, technological, and natural.
CO-4: Discuss the strategic, operational, and tactical threats presented by chemical, nuclear, and biological agents, to include agent characteristics and delivery systems.
CO-5: Distinguish among and assess the various homeland security approaches, techniques, and processes, such as analytics, indications, warnings, and forecasting.
CO-6: Explain the key administrative and command and control elements of the evolving homeland security relationships among the intelligence community; Department of Homeland Security; interagency processes and institutions; federal, state, and local intergovernmental relations; and a comprehensive U.S. homeland security strategy.

Discussions – 25 percent

Each week, a discussion question is provided, and posts should reflect an assimilation of the readings. Students are required to provide a substantive initial post by Thursday at 11:59 pm ET and respond to 2 or more classmates by Sunday 11:59 pm ET. Discussion posts are graded on timeliness, relevance, knowledge of the weekly readings, and the quality of original ideas.

Reflections (6) – 20 percent

Research Paper Outline - 50 percent

Analyst's Paper – 25 percent

NameGrade %
Discussions 25.00 %
W1: History of Homeland Security 3.13 %
W2: Intelligence Issues 3.13 %
W3: Homegrown Violent Extremism and Terrorism 3.13 %
W4: Border and Coastal Security 3.13 %
W5: Critical Infrastructure Protection Issues 3.13 %
W6: Homeland Security Legal & Ethical Issues 3.13 %
W7: Homeland Security Issues 3.13 %
W8: Current and Future Issues 3.13 %
Analyst's Paper 25.00 %
Analyst's Paper 25.00 %
Reflections 50.00 %
Reflection 1 8.33 %
Reflection 2 8.33 %
Reflection 3 8.33 %
Reflection 4 8.33 %
Reflection 5 8.33 %
Reflection 6 8.33 %

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1: Examine the historical and evolving concept of homeland security within the broader political and national security system of the contemporary nation-state.
CO-2: Recognize the detailed mitigation, planning, response, and recovery phases to and from a homeland security incident.
CO-3: Differentiate among the various homeland security threats, to include those that are manmade, technological, and natural.
CO-4: Discuss the strategic, operational, and tactical threats presented by chemical, nuclear, and biological agents, to include agent characteristics and delivery systems.
CO-5: Distinguish among and assess the various homeland security approaches, techniques, and processes, such as analytics, indications, warnings, and forecasting.
CO-6: Explain the key administrative and command and control elements of the evolving homeland security relationships among the intelligence community; Department of Homeland Security; interagency processes and institutions; federal, state, and local intergovernmental relations; and a comprehensive U.S. homeland security strategy.

Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.