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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST557 Course ID: 3507 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

This course explores the history of expressive and material cultures around the world, with emphasis on industrialized nations. Topics include aesthetics, social identification, and production, consumption, and reception of cultural forms. Using literature, films, pictures, and music, students study theories of popular culture and aesthetic hierarchy; explicate historical contexts of artistic movements; discuss cultural imperialism; address problems of cultural appropriation, creativity, and identity; and examine cultural expressions of social difference and deviance. Topics also include the social history of culture in the age of mass society, including popular arts and the culture of consumption.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

Upon completion of History and Popular Culture students will be able to:

  1. Assess the meanings, methods, and objectives of the history of popular culture.
  2. Develop an original interpretation about history and popular culture.
  3. Appraise the difference between primary and secondary sources.
  4. Critique the work of other students in a professional manner and respond positively to the critiques of other students.
  5. Analyze role of simulation in the history of popular culture.
  6. Evaluate the role of the city shaping popular culture.
  7. Explore the ways that institutions and places like, universities, hospitals, hotels, cemeteries, stadiums, amusement parks, restaurants, movie theaters, malls, prisons, and zoos, have contributed to popular culture.

This course requires thoughtful reading and analysis. The discussion, assignments, and research paper are designed to allow you to demonstrate a thorough comprehension of the concepts introduced in the readings. Your perception of the issues introduced in these readings will be shaped by your worldview and experience. Feel free to report your views but do so in a considerate and thoughtful manner, and they must be grounded in scholarly evidence. Since this is a graduate-level coursework, do not merely regurgitate information from the reading assignments. You are expected to analyze, critique, and agree, or disagree, with the authors. My expectation is that your work is original. Academic integrity is essential. Scrupulously acknowledge the source of direct quotes, paraphrased passages, and another’s ideas.

There are many ways to measure student performance. The following guidelines apply:

  • Faculty grade writing assignments using the APUS writing rubrics appropriate for the level of the course. Rubrics ensure that grading is consistent across the institution, and that all key areas of the graded work receive attention. It is also advisable to share the rubric with students, so that they are aware of the instructor’s expectations. Rubrics are the university approved basis for grading written assignments. The rubrics for undergraduate and graduate writing assignments may be found at Writing Rubrics.

  • For written assignments, students should upload assignments by selecting the Assignments link on the left hand side of the classroom page.

  • For discussions select the Forums link on the left hand side of the classroom page. The Forums should not be used for administrative communications.

Forum Assignments: 40% of your grade (8 Forum postings, 50 points each)

Respond to the Forum question(s) of the week in a main post that is at minimum 250 words and at maximum 500 words. Students should not provide just a summary of the readings but support an interpretation or argument. However, this is not a mere opinion piece; you must use the reading assignments, video assignments, and any outside research you feel is appropriate. Cite relevant examples from the week’s reading, and use the opportunity to critique the authors’ work in a positive or negative way by citing a key phrase, analyzing intent, sources, structure, or thesis. Along with citations from our readings for the week, I will expect to see outside research from the APUS Library. To meet the minimum research requirements for each week’s main post, include AT LEAST ONE scholarly source from the APUS Library in addition to citations from our weekly readings. A scholarly source is a peer reviewed article or a book from a well-regarded trade or university press. A web site does not count.

To meet the minimum participation requirements for each Forum assignment, respond to AT LEAST TWO other student postings, plus any follow-up questions I ask. As for the follow-up questions, I try to comment on everyone who posts on time during a week. If I do not, or if you post late, this does not mean you are exempt from answering an additional question from me. In that case simply select a follow-up question I asked another student and respond. This will enable you to meet the minimum discussion requirements for the week. For more on this read this link at My Forum Philosophy. The introduction forum is the only discussion where a response to an additional follow-up question from me is not required.

Discussion is a very important part of the class. It is a way to interact and learn from each other as well as demonstrate our understanding of course content. I expect all posts to be thoughtful (making good, reasoned, well-written points), thorough (accurate and complete in its response), and interesting (a response that is on point, and relevant to the question asked). When responding to other students it is not enough to simply state “I agree.” Respond to their post in a way that moves the discussion forward, and demonstrates your knowledge or unique perspective on the topic. The minimum length for a quality response to another student should be 100 words, with a maximum being 250 words.

SEE FORUM RUBRIC IN COURSE RESOURCES.

INITIAL POST IS DUE ON THURSDAY, RESPONSES ARE DUE BY SUNDAY. ALL DEADLINES ARE 11:59 PM EASTERN TIME ON THE DAY DUE.

Research Paper Proposal: 5% of your grade

In Week 4 you will submit a proposal (minimum 250 words and maximum 500 words exclusive of source list) for your final research paper. This should include a general overview of your topic, thesis, and relationship to our readings. In addition, and not part of the word count, should be a complete source list (primary and secondary). By the end of the day on Thursday of Week 4 you will post your proposal to the Forum, and by the end of the day on Sunday of Week 4 you will respond to at least two other student proposals. Share ideas on their topic, suggest secondary or primary research that might assist them, or discuss how their topic might relate to our course readings. This should be at least 100 words in length.

You MUST post your Proposal to the Assignments list as a Word Document to receive a grade. If you only post to the Forum then you will get a zero for the week.

Primary Research Essay: 5% of your grade

Strong historical research requires an effective balance between primary and secondary resources and the goal of this essay is for you to practice this vital skill. You may associate the topic for this assignment with your final research paper, though you cannot use the same text that you write for this assignment in your final paper.

In general terms this assignment is designed for you to compare and contrast a historical perspective from a secondary source (our readings in class) with a primary source. Once you have identified a topic from our readings and found a corresponding primary source answer the following questions: What new insight does the primary source provide that did not appear in the secondary source? Why are primary sources important? What are some dangers in using primary sources? The paper should be in Word format, have a minimum of 500 words, and include footnotes and a bibliography.

An example of what I am looking for is as follows. One of the best digitized collections at Google Books is The Crisis. W.E.B. DuBois founded the journal and Google Books has the complete series digitized dating back to April 1911. As a potential topic for this assignment you could explore Richard Butsch’s ideas in our reading of “American Movie Audiences of the 1930s” and compare that to specific primary research found in The Crisis. An example might be the article called “Uncle Tom in Hollywood” published in The Crisis in November 1934. (You can find the full text of this article here). Again, the goal is to find a single topic from our readings and compare and contrast it to a specific primary article or document.

You MUST post your Primary Research Essay to the Assignments list as a Word Document to receive a grade.

Mid-Term Exam: 10% of your grade

In Week 5 you will take an untimed, 20 question multiple choice test that covers the assigned books and articles (not the videos) through the first half of the course (Weeks 1 through 4). This is an open book test that concentrates on the big ideas, and not the trivial aspects of the readings. The intent of the exam is to provide you questions on what I consider to be the most important take-away concepts from our readings. Though the syllabus suggests you take this test in Week 5, and I recommend that this is the best time for you to take it, you may actually do it any time during the course. This exam may be taken only one time, so make sure you take it at a time and place where you will not be interrupted.

WARNING: After you take the exam, there are two Submit buttons. After first Submit there is a second one that asks you to confirm the submission. It is the second click that completes the process and sends the test to the server. If you do not do this, then unfortunately you may have to retake the exam.

Research Paper: 40% of your grade

Each student is required to pursue an independent research project during the course and will prepare a research paper that is to be of high quality in terms of research and scholarly analysis. Select a topic related to a cultural institution that we study in this class and analyze it in its historical context. This includes: cities, streets, hospitals, hotels, art, movies, cemeteries, parks, universities, crime, food, zoos, diners, department stores, sports, malls, skyscrapers, war, and amusement parks. You should attempt to associate the subject of your paper to one of more of the themes and issues that are addressed during this course of study. That means relate it to one of the above mentioned themes. The paper needs to also address its relationship to “popular culture” and the meanings and overall significance of the study of popular culture. You should rely on primary resources for the paper, demonstrate a thorough coverage of the relevant secondary literature, and link your ideas directly to readings in our class.

The research paper should be a minimum of 3750 words exclusive of front and back matter (the paper in total should not exceed 5000 words). It should include a title page, reference citations (from multiple sources), and a bibliography. Footnotes are required for the reference citations, and all sources, as well as the corresponding bibliography, must conform to Turabian’s Manual for Writers of Term Papers style for notes and references. Substantial research other than the required course readings is necessary. The bibliography and reference citations are not to be included in the word count. NOTE: Internet sources (web sites) should be rarely used, if ever. Exceptions are scholarly websites and documents available through the APUS Online Library (Wikipedia is not considered a valid academic source).

I will submit all of the final papers into TurnItIn which is a plagiarism checker. If I find evidence of plagiarism, I will give you a zero for the paper. To ensure this does not happen make sure you familiarize yourself with the meanings of plagiarism (see the policies section of this syllabus), and take careful steps in your note taking process to avoid a potential for a mistaken plagiarism. This review will serve as an important check for you.

The research paper is due on the final day of class. Late papers will not be accepted without an official extension.

Upon completion of History and Popular Culture students will be able to:

  1. Assess the meanings, methods, and objectives of the history of popular culture.
  2. Develop an original interpretation about history and popular culture.
  3. Appraise the difference between primary and secondary sources.
  4. Critique the work of other students in a professional manner and respond positively to the critiques of other students.
  5. Analyze role of simulation in the history of popular culture.
  6. Evaluate the role of the city shaping popular culture.
  7. Explore the ways that institutions and places like, universities, hospitals, hotels, cemeteries, stadiums, amusement parks, restaurants, movie theaters, malls, prisons, and zoos, have contributed to popular culture.

Book Title:All course readings are available in the APUS Online Library and in the classroom course folders.
ISBN:AMN
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.