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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST532 Course ID: 3076 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

This course is a study of Roman civilization from its beginnings to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD. The course emphasizes ancient Rome's constitutional, political, economic, social, diplomatic, military, naval, maritime, artistic, architectural, engineering, legal, philosophical and intellectual dynamics. Key topics include the Roman way of land and naval warfare, maritime trade and the economy, Punic and Gallic Wars, imperial expansion, transition from Republic to Empire, the Imperial system, Republic and Imperial constitutions, and the impact of Ancient Rome on the evolving Western Civilization.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session
08/29/2022 - 02/03/2023 02/06/2023 - 04/02/2023 February Winter 2023 Session I 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major pollical and military milestones in early Roman history.

CO-2 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major political and military milestones in Roman Republican history.

CO-3 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major political and military milestones in the Roman Empire.

CO-4 Analyze the social, economic, and religious elements of ancient Roman society.

CO-5 Examine significant literary genres of Roman society.

CO-6 Examine significant non-literary sources for Roman history.

CO-7 Assess the strengths and weaknesses of current theories on significant aspects of Roman society.

This course requires thoughtful reading and analysis of both primary and secondary sources. The discussions and formal assignments are designed to allow you to demonstrate a thorough comprehension of the concepts introduced in the readings. Since this is a graduate-level class, do not merely regurgitate information from the reading assignments. You are expected to analyze critique and agree, or disagree, with the authors. My expectation is that your work is original. Academic integrity is essential. Scrupulously acknowledge the source of direct quotes, paraphrased passages, and another’s ideas. There are many ways to measure student performance. For this class, a rubric will be provided for each assignment type.

Discussion Assignments: 40% of your grade (8 required discussions)

Discussions for this course come in 2 varieties: the introductory discussion, which is ungraded but required to secure your spot in the course, and graded, academic discussions on the readings, lecture materials, and formal assignments. Specific directions for each discussion topic are posted in the course site under Discussions. In general, you can expect to write extensively in the discussions. It is in the discussions that we will work through the material in the readings and begin to articulate our thoughts on appropriate methodology and theory. The grade for the discussions will be based primarily on your demonstrated analysis of the course materials. Discussions are less formal than the formal assignments for this course but the expectation is that your posts will reflect deep engagement with the weekly readings and themes. Explicit incorporation of the weekly readings is expected.

Discussion is a very important part of the class. It is a way to interact and learn from each other as well as demonstrate our understanding of course content. I expect all posts to be thoughtful (making good, reasoned, well-written points), thorough (accurate and complete in its response), and interesting (a response that is on point, and relevant to the question asked). When responding to other students it is not enough to simply state “I agree.” Respond to the posts of other students in way that moves the discussion forward and demonstrates your knowledge or unique perspective on the topic.

Formal Assignments 60% of your grade

Your instructor will set formal assessments. The directions and rubrics for these will be posted within your course site. For all formal assignments, the expectation is that students will use formal, objective language, and formal citation. Any scholarship consulted and incorporated must meet the criteria for sources and align with the program objectives of our history department and the learning objectives of this course, as determined by your instructor. All assessments will be designed to ensure that students gain experience using current, professional research tools and engage in best practices for the study of ancient history.

NameGrade %
Assignments 60.00 %
Assignment 1 20.00 %
Assignment 2 20.00 %
Assignment 3 20.00 %
Discussions 40.00 %
Week 1 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 2 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 3 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 4 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 5 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 6 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 7 Discussion 5.00 %
Week 8 Discussion 5.00 %

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major pollical and military milestones in early Roman history.

CO-2 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major political and military milestones in Roman Republican history.

CO-3 Distinguish the individual factors that contributed to the development of major political and military milestones in the Roman Empire.

CO-4 Analyze the social, economic, and religious elements of ancient Roman society.

CO-5 Examine significant literary genres of Roman society.

CO-6 Examine significant non-literary sources for Roman history.

CO-7 Assess the strengths and weaknesses of current theories on significant aspects of Roman society.

Book Title:Ancient Rome: A New History, 3rd ed *Note: the price provided is for the VitalSource eBook
ISBN:9780500294123
Publication Info:W.W. Norton
Author:Potter, D.
Unit Cost:$42.11
Electronic ISBN:9780500841297R180
Electronic Unit Cost:$42.11
 
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.