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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST521 Course ID: 3973 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

The Seminar in Public History examines the varied and interdisciplinary "field" of Public History--such as community/local history, historic preservation, archives, historical archaeology, museum studies, business and policy history, documentary editing and publishing, and documentary films--through readings, class discussions, occasional guest speakers, and occasional field trips. The central theme explores some of the many ways people create and convey history, some of the major themes in community and social history, and the problems and possibilities of working as historians in public settings.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1 Assess important historical developments in the field of public history, including the intellectual, ethical, and professional issues that public historians have confronted.

CO-2 Examine theories and practices relevant to the roles public historians fill in contemporary society.

CO-3 Critique the format and content of public history products such as exhibitions, historic preservation reports, and interpretive projects.

CO-4 Evaluate and conduct research in the scholarly literature of historical topics and the professional literature pertaining to the theory and practice of history.

CO-5 Produce professional products in selected fields of public history.

CO-6 Evaluate the role public history plays in the construction of historical memory and identity.

CO-7 Differentiate between the various fields and applications of public history.

This course requires thoughtful reading and analysis. The discussions, assignments, and research paper are designed to allow you to demonstrate a thorough comprehension of the concepts introduced in the readings. Your perception of the issues introduced in these readings will be shaped by your worldview and experience. Feel free to report your views but do so in a considerate and thoughtful manner, and they must be grounded in scholarly evidence. Since this is a graduate-level coursework, do not merely regurgitate information from the reading assignments. You are expected to analyze, critique, and agree, or disagree, with the authors. My expectation is that your work is original. Academic integrity is essential. Scrupulously acknowledge the source of direct quotes, paraphrased passages, and another’s ideas.

Recommended prerequisites for this course are two core course: HIST 500 – Historical Research Methods and HIST 501 – Historiography. The Department of History and Military History requires that you use the Chicago Manual of Style for formatting and documenting work submitted in the department. Failure to do so will result in work being returned without comment or grading for correction.

Written work in the form of your responses to questions accounts for 50% of the grade in this class. Other work in the form of Assignments accounts for 50% of the grade in this class.

Discussion Topics: 45% of your grade (8 Topics, some with two questions, 100 points each)

Discussion is a very important part of the class. It is a way to interact and learn from each other as well as demonstrate our understanding of course content. I expect all posts to be thoughtful (making good, reasoned, well-written points), thorough (accurate and complete in its response), and interesting (a response that is on point, and relevant to the question asked). Scholarly discussions are based are on evidence, so cite your sources and cite them fully per the Turabian/Chicago style.

The Graduate Program in History has developed standards for students participating in discussions. The basic requirements are:

Participation is required while the discussion is current.

INITIAL POST IS DUE ON THURSDAY, ALL RESPONSES ARE DUE BY SUNDAY. ALL DEADLINES ARE 11:55 EASTERN TIME ON THE DAY DUE. Due every week.

Museum Evaluation: 5% of your grade (100 points)

Prepare an analysis of a particular museum's physical facilities (like buildings, parking, trails), interpretive programs (like exhibits, tours, outside signage), and collections management (like storage, conservation, environmental controls). Pick a museum near so that you accomplish this assignment in your words, in your assessment. (If you use a virtual museum, evaluate the entire museum in digital terms equivalent to the physical museum's.) This is due Week 2, and this is attached to the discussion in Week Two.

Proposal for Final Project: 5% of your grade (100 points)

The last assignment in this class is to produce a public history product, a complete and finished project. Here, for ten points and in no more than three pages, propose that project. What is the topic? the format? the scope and range? the sources? the examples of such projects? the professional literature relevant to this type of project? What will you submit for grading—what is the product? The proposal is due Week Four.

Preservation Project: 15% of your grade (100 points)

You can choose between writing a report on a property according to National Register Historic Context guidelines, or you may create a virtual museum exhibit on a preservation topic that will require you to arrange multimedia in an engaging and informative presentation of history. This due in Week Six.

(1) Historic Context: Use the appropriate National Register guidelines and form — See National Register of Historic Places Program: Publications, https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nationalregister/publications.htm to write and submit a Historic Context for a property not already listed on the National Register. That means doing research in the National Register’s database (https://www.nps.gov/subjects/nationalregister/database-research.htm) before selecting a property. While there select a local example of a listed property to see what your product might look like. When you post your preservation project to a forum, discuss What are the issues of preservation? Why preserve this property?

OR

(2) Virtual Museum Exhibit: Develop a multimedia museum exhibit on a preservation topic of your choosing. What are the issues of preservation? Why preserve the historic property?

Public History Project: 25% of your grade (100 points)

This assignment will require you to apply the theories, practices, and subjects, discussed in the discussion and course materials, by completing a Public History Project, and submitting the final product. This assignment is due Week Eight.

NameGrade %
Museum Evaluation 5.00 %
Week 2 - Museum Evaluation 5.00 %
Proposal 5.00 %
Week 4- Proposal for Final Project 5.00 %
Preservation Project 20.00 %
Week 6 - Preservation Project 20.00 %
Public History Project 25.00 %
Week 8- Public History Project 25.00 %
Discussions 45.00 %
Week 1: Introduction 3.46 %
Week 2: Public History 3.46 %
Week 2: Museum Evaluation 3.46 %
Week 3: Exhibit Nuts & Bolts 3.46 %
Week 4: Military History 3.46 %
Week 4: Post Your Proposal 3.46 %
Week 5: Historic Preservation Laws 3.46 %
Week 5: Significance of Preservation 3.46 %
Week 6: Historic Context Virtual Museum Paper 3.46 %
Week 7: Jobs 3.46 %
Week 7: Archives 3.46 %
Week 8: Digital Applications 3.46 %
Week 8: Your Final Project 3.46 %

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to:

CO-1 Assess important historical developments in the field of public history, including the intellectual, ethical, and professional issues that public historians have confronted.

CO-2 Examine theories and practices relevant to the roles public historians fill in contemporary society.

CO-3 Critique the format and content of public history products such as exhibitions, historic preservation reports, and interpretive projects.

CO-4 Evaluate and conduct research in the scholarly literature of historical topics and the professional literature pertaining to the theory and practice of history.

CO-5 Produce professional products in selected fields of public history.

CO-6 Evaluate the role public history plays in the construction of historical memory and identity.

CO-7 Differentiate between the various fields and applications of public history.

Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Links provided inside the classroom.
Author:No Author Specified
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.