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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST404 Course ID: 3066 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

Jacksonian America, 1815-1846 examines the nature of Jacksonian democracy and its treatment in American historiography. Through a study of the primary and secondary literature of American history this course surveys the individuals and groups who influenced the American experience, as well as the cultural, political, and socio-economic movements that shaped the nation. (Prerequisites: HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only)

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

Upon completion of Jacksonian America, 1815-1846, students will be able to:

CO-1 Demonstrate the historical development of the nation from the Treaty of Ghent to the outbreak of war with Mexico, the major figures in the American experience, and their significance.

CO-2 Extrapolate the major foreign policy goals of the nation from the Madison to the Polk administrations, as well as the internal and external forces that influenced American foreign policy in the Jacksonian era.

CO-3 Examine the major economic cycles and the causes of economic change, along with the key points in the evolution of American commerce and society.

CO-4 Clarify the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and the state and federal judiciaries in developing a framework for future American economic development.

CO-5 Evaluate the various, and sometimes conflicting, attempts to deal with the social, political and economic changes brought on by westward expansion, immigration, population growth, and industrial development.

The course grade will consist of the average of grades earned for responses to Forums questions, the mid-course and final examinations, and the research paper.


In addition to a Virtual Introduction for Week 1, Discussion responses are required for Weeks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7. These responses – also called “posts” -- will involve analyzing readings, comparing and contrasting the views of authors, and critiquing arguments presented by the readings or the class. Students are asked to respond to the Discussions listed below in the Assignments column in an initial post. Then they are to respond to at least 3 posts by fellow learners. The initial post is due 11:55 p.m., ET, the Friday of the week. Each response is due 11:55 p.m., ET, the following Sunday of the week. During the course of a discussion, the instructor may post an additional question that some or all students are required to respond to. Follow-up responses will be considered in the scoring of the Discussions.


All cases of written submissions – whether the writing assignment, the examinations, or Forum postings -- will be judged for accuracy of interpretation, rigor of argument, and clarity of expression. Opinions must be supported by evidence from the readings or outside sources, which must be cited. Weight will also be given to correct spelling, grammar, clarity of exposition, and other writing technicalities. In this regard, pay particular attention to the “Standards for Evaluating Written Work” in the Resources section of the e-classroom. These apply as well to e-mail messages.


It should be pointed out that in online courses, knowledge is gained not just by completing readings and written assignments but by communicating with classmates and learning from what they have to say. For this reason, the Forum responses – the online conversations – are given great weight in evaluating a student’s performance.


Responses and discussion should abide by the University Netiquette policy (see below.) The purpose of the Discussion activities is to expand your learning opportunities by engaging in academic and thought-provoking asynchronous conversation with your classmates and instructor. The instructor’s role is to facilitate the learning process by participating in the discussions and moving conversations by promoting an advanced level of inquiry.


The exams will consist of essay questions to gauge the student’s understanding of the assigned readings. They are open-book, non-proctored exams. The exam questions are similar in format and content to the Forums questions, and each question will require a response of 2-3 pages (or about 750-1,000 words). The exams will be activated a week before the due date.The research paper should be 10-12 pages in length, excluding the title page and bibliography, using the Turabian style. A list of possible topics is in the Course Materials section of the classroom.


For all assignments – Discussion postings, exams and essays – follow the guidelines outlined in the documents “Course Assignment Policy” and “Rubrics: Standards for Evaluation” in the Course Materials section of the course site

NameGrade %
Discussions 30.00 %
Week 1: Virtual Introduction 2.50 %
Week 1: War of 1812: Cast Your Vote 2.50 %
Week 2: Discussion 2.50 %
Week 2: Era of Good Feelings 2.50 %
Week 3: Discussion 2.50 %
Week 3: Election of 1824 2.50 %
Week 5: Discussion 2.50 %
Week 5: Federal Indian Policy 2.50 %
Week 6: Discussion 2.50 %
Week 7: Discussion 2.50 %
Week 7: Mexican War 2.50 %
Week 8: Wrap-up 2.50 %
Assignments 25.00 %
Week 7: Research Paper 25.00 %
Week 4: Mid-course Examination 20.00 %
Week 4: Mid-course Examination 20.00 %
Week 8: Final Examination 25.00 %
Week 8: Final Examination 25.00 %

Upon completion of Jacksonian America, 1815-1846, students will be able to:

CO-1 Demonstrate the historical development of the nation from the Treaty of Ghent to the outbreak of war with Mexico, the major figures in the American experience, and their significance.

CO-2 Extrapolate the major foreign policy goals of the nation from the Madison to the Polk administrations, as well as the internal and external forces that influenced American foreign policy in the Jacksonian era.

CO-3 Examine the major economic cycles and the causes of economic change, along with the key points in the evolution of American commerce and society.

CO-4 Clarify the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and the state and federal judiciaries in developing a framework for future American economic development.

CO-5 Evaluate the various, and sometimes conflicting, attempts to deal with the social, political and economic changes brought on by westward expansion, immigration, population growth, and industrial development.

Book Title:What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848 - e-book available in the APUS Online Library
ISBN:9780195078947
Author:Howe, Daniel Walker
Unit Cost:$25.45
 
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.