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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST310 Course ID: 3147 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

The course evaluates European politics from the French Revolution to the industrialization process and effects in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Students assess the impact of military modernization and analyze the commercialization of the culture. An overview of politics and wars in the 20th century and their relationship to the fall and rise of the economy will be presented as well as the concept of European security. The forces of modernization, causes of war, and power of unification will be evaluated, with an emphasis on effects and divisions of the Cold War and democratization wave of the 1990’s. It will examine the evolution of trade unions to a regional union with its effects on politics, economics and security, including case studies of regional terrorism. (Prerequisites: HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only)

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
03/29/2022 - 09/02/2022 09/05/2022 - 10/30/2022 September Summer 2022 Session D 8 Week session
05/21/2022 - 11/04/2022 11/07/2022 - 01/01/2023 November Fall 2022 Session I 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

The successful student will accomplish the following learning objectives for this course:

CO-1: Assess the importance and effects of the French Revolution on the history of Europe.

CO-2: Analyze the origins and effects of both Industrialization and 19th Century Imperialism

CO-3: Assess the development and impact of new ideologies and changing ideologies on European society and politics both in the 19th century and following World War I.

CO-4: Evaluate the politics of radicalization and the effect on the development of Modern Europe.

CO-5: Analyze the social, political, economic and cultural effects of the Cold War.

Weekly Objectives:

Week 1: Study the French Revolution and Napoleon through the use of primary sources, an academic article, and lecture. Examine the causes, course, problems, and short-term and long-term impact of the revolution. Was Napoleon the savior of the revolution or another tyrant?

Week 2: Using primary sources and lectures discuss and analyze the early to mid 19th century from the Restoration to the 19th Century Revolutions. Compare the different ideologies that developed during this period, and explore their impact on the course of European development in culture, society, and politics.

Week 3: Examine through primary sources, lecture, and the assigned novel the connections between the Industrial Revolution and High Imperialism. Study the impact of both Industrialization and Imperialism on different classes and groups of people both inside and outside of Europe. Evaluate the individual causes, justifications, developments, and impact of both industrialization and imperialism.

Week 4: Using the course text, lectures, and sources, explore the state of Europe in the late 19th century. Discuss and analyze the impact 19th century ideologies, revolutions, industrialization, and imperialism had on society and politics. Compare and contrast the society and politics of the individual European nations on the eve of World War I.

Week 5: Explore through the course material the shattering of 19th century beliefs due to the outbreak of World War I and the course of the fighting using new technology and changes to technology throughout the war. Discuss the changes to socialism within Russia and the creation of a communist state. Analyze the changes caused to society in Europe due to both the war and the Russian Revolution in the 1920s.

Week 6: Continuing with the changes discussed in the 1920s from World War I in Week 5, study the causes and ability of totalitarian rulers, including Stalin, Franco, Hitler, and Mussolini, to rise to power. Examine the types of states these leaders created, their goals, and ideologies. Compare and contrast the first two genocides of the 20th century, which occurred “under the cover of war” as well as Stalin’s purges and the Ukrainian forced famine. Watch survivor testimonies.

Week 7: Using the course text and documents, lectures, and videos study the course of World War II and the tensions and divides created during the war that transformed allies to enemies in the Cold War. Examine both Stalinist USSR and post-Stalin USSR. How did the USSR survive the death of Stalin? Discuss and evaluate the creation of the European Union and cooperation.

Week 8: Analyze the disintegration and divide of the last of the European communist nations. Study the civil war, the involvement of the UN, and the creation of independent states. What do you learn about post Cold War warfare? Investigate the “Ethnic Cleansing” during the war and compare with the other 20th century European genocides.

As your instructor, I will determine your final grade for this course based on the following grading instruments:

Introduction/expectations posting:

During the first week of the course you will have an opportunity to introduce yourself to the class, share your educational background/experience, and share why you are taking this course and what your expectations are. Please post your introduction under “Our Online Community” and reply to the introductions of four other students.

Discussion Postings:
Each week you will be expected to write an original post using the provided questions as a guide. In your posts, you should express your own ideas, and use the course materials (lectures, sources, and readings) to support your evaluation. The initial post is due at 11:55 pm ET, Friday. Additionally, there will be a follow-up question to the initial submission which is due at 11:55 pm ET, the following Sunday. Discussion postings are expected to be engaging and contribute to the intellectual dialogue. Finally, you are also expected to reply to at least four of your fellow classmate’s original postings each week. Peer responses are due at 11:55 pm ET, Sunday.

The Discussions are meant to be intellectual conversations that focus on each week's topic. Conversations, as such, do not require citations. Good historians will invariably rely on evidence, and in those cases it is appropriate to give reference to that sources.

Important Note: The Director of History and Military History Programs requires conformity with the traditional citation method used by Historians. This is the University of Chicago Style Manual and its Turabian offshoot. Citations will follow traditional endnote attribution. Do not use parenthetical (APA / MLA) variations. Students in history cannot use Wikipedia or encyclopedias (this includes online encyclopedias) as references for any form of assignment. You may use dictionaries for specific definitions when necessary.

Topic Papers:

For this course, you are expected to write two 5-7 page papers. These papers are analytical / critical in nature and must contain a thesis statement (an argument). Each of these topic papers have required sources (see below). However in addition to the 2 provided sources, students need to use at least three other sources in the paper (not including course resources), one of which must be a journal article or another book. For the other sources, you may use internet sites; however, they must be academic, reliable sites; or you may include more books, journal articles, or primary sources. The APUS library will be a valuable resource for these papers. Additional internet, book, journal sources, and class resources (lectures) may be used in your paper (excluding encyclopedias) in addition to the 5 required sources. You must properly cite all your sources: data, information, quotations, and paraphrasing (anything that is not common knowledge) using the Chicago style citation from the Chicago Style Manuel or Turabian. (footnotes/endnotes). The Online Library has a link to The Chicago Manuel –Online. The Online Library has many resources in aiding you in writing an excellent paper. You can find information by logging into the Online Library and selecting the link for “Tutorials and Student Studies Center.”

The first topic paper for the course is on Imperialism. For this paper you are required to read Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. Additionally, you need to utilize Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness: A Case Book edited by Gene M. Moore. Gene M. Moore’s work is a collection of essays and you must use at least one of these essays in your paper. Both of these sources are found as an electronic resource in the Online Library, and need to be incorporated significantly into your research paper. Additionally you must use at least three other sources in your paper, as indicated above. This paper is an opportunity for you to research a topic within Imperialism that interests you. It is up to you to focus your paper and create a thesis. Some examples of topics are: the treatment of Africans during Imperialism, a comparison between imperialism of the Congo with that of another region (inside or outside of Africa), the consequences of imperialism, or how imperialism was viewed in Europe.

The second topic paper is on the Armenian Genocide. For this paper, you are required to watch the video PBS Special: Armenian Genocide and Exploring the Issues and read Chapter 2 “The Armenian Genocide” in Century of Genocide: Critical Essays and Eyewitness Accounts (From the Online Library). Both of these sources need to be incorporated into your research paper. This paper is an opportunity for you to research a topic within the Armenian Genocide that interests you. It is up to you to focus your paper and create a thesis. Some examples of topics are: the causes and justifications of the genocide; Turkish denial of the genocide; comparisons between the Armenian genocide with a different genocide, or the consequences/impact of the genocide.

Exams:

There will be two exams given in this course, a midterm and a final. The midterm exam will cover the material addressed between weeks 1 and 4; the final exam will primarily cover the material discussed between weeks 5 and 7. However, on the final exam, you will be expected to tie together information from the first half of the course with the second half. The exams are open note and open book. Both exams will consist of ids and essays. You will have two weeks to complete each exam. You will be expected to utilize lectures, sources, the textbook, and discussions in your exams. You must cite where your information came from, quotes, paraphrasing and ideas that are not your own (including ideas and information from the forums). You must use the Chicago style citation from the Chicago Style Manuel or Turabian.

Note: Students are expected to complete the course requirements per the course schedule. If circumstances come up that impede your ability to complete an assignment on time, please contact the instructor before the due date to discuss the situation and a possible solution. Students should expect to receive only partial credit for late submissions.

The successful student will accomplish the following learning objectives for this course:

CO-1: Assess the importance and effects of the French Revolution on the history of Europe.

CO-2: Analyze the origins and effects of both Industrialization and 19th Century Imperialism

CO-3: Assess the development and impact of new ideologies and changing ideologies on European society and politics both in the 19th century and following World War I.

CO-4: Evaluate the politics of radicalization and the effect on the development of Modern Europe.

CO-5: Analyze the social, political, economic and cultural effects of the Cold War.

Weekly Objectives:

Week 1: Study the French Revolution and Napoleon through the use of primary sources, an academic article, and lecture. Examine the causes, course, problems, and short-term and long-term impact of the revolution. Was Napoleon the savior of the revolution or another tyrant?

Week 2: Using primary sources and lectures discuss and analyze the early to mid 19th century from the Restoration to the 19th Century Revolutions. Compare the different ideologies that developed during this period, and explore their impact on the course of European development in culture, society, and politics.

Week 3: Examine through primary sources, lecture, and the assigned novel the connections between the Industrial Revolution and High Imperialism. Study the impact of both Industrialization and Imperialism on different classes and groups of people both inside and outside of Europe. Evaluate the individual causes, justifications, developments, and impact of both industrialization and imperialism.

Week 4: Using the course text, lectures, and sources, explore the state of Europe in the late 19th century. Discuss and analyze the impact 19th century ideologies, revolutions, industrialization, and imperialism had on society and politics. Compare and contrast the society and politics of the individual European nations on the eve of World War I.

Week 5: Explore through the course material the shattering of 19th century beliefs due to the outbreak of World War I and the course of the fighting using new technology and changes to technology throughout the war. Discuss the changes to socialism within Russia and the creation of a communist state. Analyze the changes caused to society in Europe due to both the war and the Russian Revolution in the 1920s.

Week 6: Continuing with the changes discussed in the 1920s from World War I in Week 5, study the causes and ability of totalitarian rulers, including Stalin, Franco, Hitler, and Mussolini, to rise to power. Examine the types of states these leaders created, their goals, and ideologies. Compare and contrast the first two genocides of the 20th century, which occurred “under the cover of war” as well as Stalin’s purges and the Ukrainian forced famine. Watch survivor testimonies.

Week 7: Using the course text and documents, lectures, and videos study the course of World War II and the tensions and divides created during the war that transformed allies to enemies in the Cold War. Examine both Stalinist USSR and post-Stalin USSR. How did the USSR survive the death of Stalin? Discuss and evaluate the creation of the European Union and cooperation.

Week 8: Analyze the disintegration and divide of the last of the European communist nations. Study the civil war, the involvement of the UN, and the creation of independent states. What do you learn about post Cold War warfare? Investigate the “Ethnic Cleansing” during the war and compare with the other 20th century European genocides.

Book Title:A History of Modern Europe: From 1815 to the Present - Ebook available in the APUS Online Library. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:9781405121873
Publication Info:Lib
Author:Lindemann
Unit Cost:$33.65
 
Book Title:A Short History of the French Revolution, 6th Ed - Ebook available via the APUS online library. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:9780205968459
Publication Info:Routledge Lib
Author:Popkin, Jeremy D.
Unit Cost:$60.89
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.