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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST270 Course ID: 4660 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

Science is unquestionably central in shaping our modern world. Though often directed by the “big science” efforts of universities, global corporations, and nations, it is the individual scientist that populates these scientific communities. It is at this individual level, both professionally and personally, that science touches us most directly. Students earn advanced degrees in a wide range of specialties like physics, biology, and chemistry. Science is also a central component in related fields of medicine, geology, genetics, ecology, cosmology, and technology. On the personal level we encounter science everyday when we eat genetically enhanced food, take complicated medicines to combat illness, debate the origins of life, strive to understand new information about ourselves in the universe, use advanced technologies, and in many more ways. These scientific developments do not emerge instantaneously from a vacuum. To fully understand science, one must have an appreciation of its history and how it has developed over time. The latest scientific advance is merely a snapshot of the present, and only looking at this image obscures our appreciation of the dynamic interaction between science and culture, and the ways that national, institutional, and individual goals have determined its trajectory. This broader perspective, gained only by the study of the history of science, serves as our central mission in this class.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
03/29/2022 - 09/02/2022 09/05/2022 - 10/30/2022 September Summer 2022 Session D 8 Week session
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
05/21/2022 - 11/04/2022 11/07/2022 - 01/01/2023 November Fall 2022 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session
08/29/2022 - 02/03/2023 02/06/2023 - 04/02/2023 February Winter 2023 Session I 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

Upon completion of this class students will be able to:

  1. Explain the meaning of science from the Ancient Greeks to the present and the components of the scientific method.
  2. Describe the themes and causes of the Scientific Revolution.
  3. Summarize the relationship between Enlightenment ideas and science and the emergence of collaborative and specialized scientific activities.
  4. Examine the ramifications of the Darwinian Revolution on today’s ideas.
  5. Analyze the relationship between science and politics in the 20th century and the related revolutions in physics and space science.

This course requires thoughtful reading and analysis. The discussion, assignments, and research paper are designed to allow you to demonstrate a thorough comprehension of the concepts introduced in the readings. Your perception of the issues introduced in these readings will be shaped by your worldview and experience. Feel free to report your views but do so in a considerate and thoughtful manner, and they must be grounded in scholarly evidence. Since this is a graduate-level coursework, do not merely regurgitate information from the reading assignments. You are expected to analyze, critique, and agree, or disagree, with the authors. My expectation is that your work is original. Academic integrity is essential. Scrupulously acknowledge the source of direct quotes, paraphrased passages, and another’s ideas.

There are many ways to measure student performance. The following guidelines apply:

  • Faculty grade writing assignments using the APUS writing rubrics appropriate for the level of the course. Rubrics ensure that grading is consistent across the institution, and that all key areas of the graded work receive attention. It is also advisable to share the rubric with students, so that they are aware of the instructor’s expectations. Rubrics are the university approved basis for grading written assignments.

  • For written assignments, students should upload assignments by selecting the Assignments link on the left hand side of the classroom page.

  • For discussions select the Forums link on the left hand side of the classroom page. The Forums should not be used for administrative communications.

Forums: 40% of your grade (8 Forum postings, 50 points each)

Respond to the Forum question(s) of the week in a main post that is at minimum 250 words and at maximum 500 words. Students should not provide just a summary of the readings in responding to the question, but support an interpretation or argument. However, this is not a mere opinion piece; you must use the reading assignments and outside research (all resources must be cited in proper format). Each response MUST include citations to the textbook and to the readings from the APUS library. Use these sources to assist you in answering the question you select for the week.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Forums 2 through 8 all have multiple questions associated with them. You only have to select one to answer. As I do not want duplication until all of the questions have been answered, I recommend that you "sign up" for your choice whenever you like (after the week begins) by simply posting a note in the relevant thread with your name. Again, there are no duplications allowed until all of the questions have been taken, and after that point try to evenly spread out responses. This helps ensure that we cover all the questions for the week.

SEE FORUM RUBRIC IN COURSE RESOURCES.

To meet the minimum forum requirements for each forum assignment, respond to AT LEAST three other student postings, plus any follow-up questions I ask. All of these posts must be a minimum of 100 words. As for the follow-up questions, I try to comment on everyone who posts on time during a week. If I do not, or if you post late, this does not mean you are exempt from answering an additional question from me. In that case simply select a follow-up question I asked another student and respond. This will enable you to meet the minimum discussion requirements for the week. For more on this read this link at My Forum Philosophy. The introduction forum is the only discussion where a response to an additional follow-up question from me is not required. The introduction forum also does not have a sign-up question.

INITIAL POST IS DUE ON THURSDAY, RESPONSES ARE DUE BY SUNDAY. ALL DEADLINES ARE 11:55 PM EASTERN TIME ON THE DAY DUE.

Quizzes: Week 4 and Week 8 (20% of your grade)

In Week 4 and in week 8 you will take an untimed, 20 question multiple choice quiz that covers the reading in the main textbook entitled Science and Culture (not the videos or the APUS Library readings) in the course. This is an open book test that concentrates on the big ideas, and not the trivial aspects of the readings. The intent of the quiz is to provide you questions on what I consider to be the most important take-away concepts from our readings. Though the syllabus suggests you take this exams at the end of weeks 4 and 8, and I recommend that these are the best times for you to take them, you may actually do it any time during the course. Each quiz may be taken only one time.

WARNING: After you take the quiz, there are two Submit buttons. After first Submit there is a second one that asks you to confirm the submission. It is the second click that completes the process and sends the test to the server. If you do not do this, then unfortunately you may have to retake the quiz.

Current Events Paper: Week 5 (15% of your grade)

In Week 5 you will submit a current events paper. In it you will look in the daily news for a scientific topic that interests you, and then you will go beyond what is reported in the article by discussing the long range history of this topic. There are many sources in which you can go to find a current events science story. Good examples of websites where you can find an article include:

  1. http://www.nytimes.com/pages/science/index.html
  2. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/
  3. http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/
  4. http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/
  5. http://www.sciencenews.org/
  6. http://news.sciencemag.org/
  7. http://www.scientificamerican.com/sciammag/

The article must have an author and a publication date. Avoid selecting a topic which has very little history associated with it. The topic must be related to our textbook in some way that you can connect in your paper.

Your introduction must have a strong thesis statement. I like what the Writing Center at the University of North Carolina has to say on this: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/

Technical and Formatting Requirements: With this assignment, you will learn how to do proper and adequate research and write a short paper with a central thesis statement. This paper is at least TWO complete double-spaced pages of text (Times New Roman, font size 12), not including bibliography or title page, and you must cite a minimum of THREE sources, in addition to the selected current events article and our textbook. These sources are as follows:



a. ONE primary source from the era in which you are writing about. As a reminder, a primary source “is a document or physical object which was written or created during the time under study. These sources were present during an experience or time period and offer an inside view of a particular event." http://www.princeton.edu/~refdesk/primary2.html.

b. TWO scholarly secondary sources from peer reviewed journals or books. These must be from reputable publishers (such as university presses for books or databases like JSTOR) as found in the APUS library. What is a secondary source? "A secondary source interprets and analyzes primary sources. These sources are one or more steps removed from the event." http://www.princeton.edu/~refdesk/primary2.html. Web sites are not approved research for this assignment. Exceptions are scholarly websites and documents available through the APUS Online Library (Wikipedia and other sources like it are not considered a valid academic source).

I will submit all of the final papers into TurnItIn which is a plagiarism checker. If I find evidence of plagiarism, I will give you a zero for the paper. To ensure this does not happen make sure you familiarize yourself with the meanings of plagiarism (see the policies section of this syllabus), take careful steps in your note taking process to avoid a potential for a mistaken plagiarism, and then finally submit your own paper to TurnItIn prior to the course deadline. This review will serve as an important check for you.

You MUST post your Current Events Paper to the Assignments list as a Word Document to receive a grade. If you only post to the Forum then you will get a zero for the week. See EVALUATION rubric in the Resources section of the classroom.

Research Paper: Week 8 (25% of your grade)

We have covered a great deal of time and geographical locations in our class. For the final paper you are to select the central topic of one of our weeks and write a paper that makes an argument as to why this was a period of most overall significance in the history of science. Significance should be measured by its impact on the time in which it occurred, and not by a measure of science today. For example, Ptolemy’s model of the universe is not followed today, but this does not discount the importance of his work in the period in which he lived. Therefore, an argument could be made for any of our weekly topics. Your work is graded not on which week you select, but instead the quality of your argument as to its significance.

Your introduction must have a strong thesis statement. I like what the Writing Center at the University of North Carolina has to say on this: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/thesis-statements/

Technical and Formatting Requirements: With this assignment, you will learn how to do proper and adequate research and write a short paper with a central thesis statement. This paper is at least FIVE complete double-spaced pages of text (Times New Roman, font size 12), not including bibliography or title page, and you must cite a minimum of FOUR sources plus our textbook. These sources are as follows:



a. TWO primary sources from the era in which you are writing about. As a reminder, a primary source “is a document or physical object which was written or created during the time under study. These sources were present during an experience or time period and offer an inside view of a particular event." http://www.princeton.edu/~refdesk/primary2.html.

b. TWO scholarly secondary sources from peer reviewed journals or books. These must be from reputable publishers (such as university presses for books or databases like JSTOR) as found in the APUS library. What is a secondary source? "A secondary source interprets and analyzes primary sources. These sources are one or more steps removed from the event." http://www.princeton.edu/~refdesk/primary2.html. Web sites are not approved research for this assignment. Exceptions are scholarly websites and documents available through the APUS Online Library (Wikipedia and other sources like it are not considered a valid academic source).

I will submit all of the final papers into TurnItIn which is a plagiarism checker. If I find evidence of plagiarism, I will give you a zero for the paper. To ensure this does not happen make sure you familiarize yourself with the meanings of plagiarism (see the policies section of this syllabus), take careful steps in your note taking process to avoid a potential for a mistaken plagiarism, and then finally submit your own paper to TurnItIn prior to the course deadline. This review will serve as an important check for you.

You MUST post your Research Paper to the Assignments list in the appropriate section as a Word Document to receive a grade. See EVALUATION rubric in the Resources section of the classroom.

NameGrade %
Discussions 40.00 %
Introductions 5.00 %
Week 2 : Medieval and Renaissance Science 5.00 %
Week 3 The Scientific Revolution 5.00 %
Week 4 : Science in the Enlightenment 5.00 %
Week 5 : 19th Century Biology 5.00 %
Week 6 : 20th Century Medicine and Physics 5.00 %
Week 7 : 20th Century War and Space Science 5.00 %
Week 8 : Science Today 5.00 %
Time Travel Assignment: Week 2 15.00 %
Time Travel Assignment: Week 2 15.00 %
Comparing Eras: Week 5 15.00 %
Comparing Eras: Week 5 15.00 %
The Physicists: Week 8 20.00 %
The Physicists: Week 8 20.00 %
Quiz 10.00 %
Quiz 10.00 %

Upon completion of this class students will be able to:

  1. Explain the meaning of science from the Ancient Greeks to the present and the components of the scientific method.
  2. Describe the themes and causes of the Scientific Revolution.
  3. Summarize the relationship between Enlightenment ideas and science and the emergence of collaborative and specialized scientific activities.
  4. Examine the ramifications of the Darwinian Revolution on today’s ideas.
  5. Analyze the relationship between science and politics in the 20th century and the related revolutions in physics and space science.
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.