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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST222 Course ID: 3049 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course surveys the economic, cultural, and political facets of the African American experience from 1877 to the present. Topics of African American history will be examined, such as Jim Crow laws, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and Black Power. While the class is designed to proceed chronologically, themes such as military and diplomatic policies, migration and urbanization, black political thought, and popular culture will be emphasized.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
03/29/2022 - 09/02/2022 09/05/2022 - 10/30/2022 September Summer 2022 Session D 8 Week session
04/26/2022 - 09/30/2022 10/03/2022 - 11/27/2022 October Fall 2022 Session B 8 Week session
05/21/2022 - 11/04/2022 11/07/2022 - 01/01/2023 November Fall 2022 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/2022 - 12/02/2022 12/05/2022 - 01/29/2023 December Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session
07/25/2022 - 12/30/2022 01/02/2023 - 02/26/2023 January Winter 2023 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

Specifically, this course will require the student to:
• Effectively discuss African Americans and their experiences to better understand their impact on national history
• Analyze the role of racism and how it has shaped the lives of African Americans
• Explain the significance of African American philosophers and thinkers such as Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois, Ida B. Wells, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X and others to the American historical narrative.
• Identify the role that African American women had in securing civil and gender rights
• Describe the impact of the Great Depression and New Deal on the lives of African Americans
• Analyze how African Americans were able to create cultural power and identify individuals that contributed to cultural production
• Recognize the various methods and philosophies used to campaign for advancements in civil rights by the African American community
• Understand the significance of past historical events on issues surrounding the African American community today
• Learn to critically read and think about classroom materials.
• Distinguish and critically evaluate primary and secondary historical sources
• Analyze and interpret historical issues as they relate to African-American history and conduct university-level research on the subject that is communicated effectively in writing

Reading Assignments: This course relies mainly on the assigned text, lectures, and supplemental readings. Links to these readings are located in the weekly lesson section of the course.
Discussion Assignments: Throughout the course you will answer questions in the Discussions, respond to the postings of your classmates, and answer follow-up questions posted in the Discussions. Directions for the Discussion assignments are located in the Discussion area.
Written Assignments: During the course you will write two short papers, each at least three pages long plus a cover page and a reference page. An in-depth explanation of the exact expectations is located in the Assignment area of the class.
Written Assignment Follow-On Questions: After grading each of the two writing assignments you will be asked to complete a Discussion follow up for weeks 5 & 8. These Discussions will require a question to be answered or paper post and peer responses.
Exams: There is an open book final exam, non-proctored, that will be available for you to complete during Week Eight.

NameGrade %
Discussions 34.00 %
Discussion 1-Initial Post and Peer Responses 6.80 %
Discussion 2 - Initial Post and Peer Responses 6.80 %
Discussion 4 - Initial Post and Peer Responses 6.80 %
Discussion 5 - Initial Post and Peer Responses 6.80 %
Discussion 7 - Initial Post and Peer Responses 6.80 %
Debates 22.00 %
Debate Week 3 11.00 %
Debate Week 6 11.00 %
Essays (Formal) 34.00 %
Essay Week 2 8.50 %
Essay Week 4 8.50 %
Essay Week 5 8.50 %
Essay Week 7 8.50 %
Week 8 Final Essay 10.00 %
Week 8 Final Essay 10.00 %

Specifically, this course will require the student to:
• Effectively discuss African Americans and their experiences to better understand their impact on national history
• Analyze the role of racism and how it has shaped the lives of African Americans
• Explain the significance of African American philosophers and thinkers such as Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois, Ida B. Wells, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X and others to the American historical narrative.
• Identify the role that African American women had in securing civil and gender rights
• Describe the impact of the Great Depression and New Deal on the lives of African Americans
• Analyze how African Americans were able to create cultural power and identify individuals that contributed to cultural production
• Recognize the various methods and philosophies used to campaign for advancements in civil rights by the African American community
• Understand the significance of past historical events on issues surrounding the African American community today
• Learn to critically read and think about classroom materials.
• Distinguish and critically evaluate primary and secondary historical sources
• Analyze and interpret historical issues as they relate to African-American history and conduct university-level research on the subject that is communicated effectively in writing

Book Title:To Make Our World Anew: Vol II: A History of African Americans Since 1880 - e-book available in the APUS Online Library and in the classroom
ISBN:9780195181357
Publication Info:Oxford University Press Lib
Author:Kelley & Lewis
Unit Cost:$14.42
 
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.