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Course Details

 

Course Details

Course Code: HIST213 Course ID: 3845 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course has been designed as an introduction to the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. It will be surveying the field of American women's history in order to understand how specific political, social and economic transformations in the nation's past have affected the female half of the population. Throughout, it will remain attuned to ethnic and racial diversity and to regional differences and class distinctions in the lives of U.S. women. It will look at women's culture, as distinct from the dominant male culture, and analyze women's writings, art, life cycles and sexuality. It will work to understand the collective lives of women as workers, family members, reformers, and political activists as well as the individual experiences of women in the U.S. from the colonial era into the 21st Century.

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Start Month Session Weeks
05/21/2021 - 10/29/2021 11/01/2021 - 12/26/2021 November Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/2021 - 12/31/2021 01/03/2022 - 02/27/2022 January Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/2021 - 03/04/2022 03/07/2022 - 05/01/2022 March Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing HIST 213, you should be able to:

CO-1: Analyze the contributions of generations of women to U.S history.

CO-2: Explain the influence of race, class, and region on women's life experiences

CO-3: Compare and contrast changes and continuities in the popular images of women and families from the colonial era to the present.

CO-4: Recall how women have exercised direct and indirect power in American society CO-5: Show the basis for reform movements that led to the evolution of women’s’ rights

CO-6: Illustrate the political and economic impact of industrialization on the lives of American women.

Your final grade for this course based on the following grading instruments:

Discussion​ Postings are a critical component of all History classes. Studies indicate that students who participate in discussions increase their retention on the particular subjects by over 40 percent compared to only reading the text. The requirements for your discussion postings revolve around you answering question(s) posted in the Discussion by your instructor with a substantial posting. During each Discussion, your instructor will reply back to one of your postings, either your primary answer to the question or a comment that you made to another student and you will be required to answer this question. Your grade on the Discussion posting therefore includes your initial answer and replying to your instructor’s question. While composing your answer, use proper English. Before you post the answer, check your grammar; please note that the way you talk is not the way that you need to write your answer. Lastly, ensure that you do not have any spelling errors. It is often best to compose your posting in a word processing program and after you check it for grammar and spelling, copy it into the Discussion posting.

Forum Participation is key to helping you gain a greater comprehension of the topics. As such, you must read at least three postings by your fellow students and respond to them with a substantial posting of 125 to 150 words. If you have a question for another student in your response, you will note the question at the bottom of your posting separated by at least one line so that he/she can clearly see your question. It is your responsibility to check for comments made back to you by your classmates and answer any of their questions. Your grade on forum participation is from your comments to other students and the answers you provide to any questions that they have of you. You are also required to answer any questions the instructor may ask as well. As in the Forum Posting, English is important and your writing must be clear and free of errors.

The Mid Term Project will allow you to explore one of the reform movements of the Antebellum Era. You will conduct research to identify the causes, goals, tactics, key events, key figures, successes, and failures of your chosen reform movement. From there, you will showcase your research in a Power Point presentation. You must consult a minimum of three scholarly sources in your presentation.

A Research Proposal Paper is the beginning of the writing of your research paper. It is essential that you identify a topic early in the course that interests you and write a thesis statement, begin initial research for sources, and draft an outline. You must submit this proposal to the instructor by the end of Week Five of the class for approval. Without approval, you cannot begin writing your research paper and you cannot wait until the week before the Research Paper is due to submit the proposal, therefore it is essential that you submit it during week five.

An Internet Research Assignment allows you, early in the course, to demonstrate your research skills to your instructor and to receive feedback that will benefit you when you write your research paper. With this assignment, you will learn how to do proper and adequate research online by finding five scholarly websites and providing an annotation for each. Discuss what is useful about the website, what is not, how it can be used in an academic setting, and the audience for whom the website is geared. As with all assignments, online encyclopedias such as Wikipedia or Encarta are not allowed. Your websites and your annotations will be posted in the forum for your fellow students to comment on.

A Research Paper, by its very design, will test your ability to construct a well-written paper that shows your comprehension of the topic through analysis of various resources. For many students, writing a research paper can be one of the most intimidating assignments that they will face in a class. In reality, a research paper is only a series of tasks using several intellectual skills. Once you understand this assignment not as a large paper that requires weeks of research and writing, but a series of skills, the easier the paper will be to write. As addressed earlier, the initial step in writing the paper is choosing the topic, the second is choosing a bibliography (your sources), and the third step is creating an outline. You will complete all three of these steps in the Research Proposal Paper, which you should view as a work in progress. The next steps include gathering information from your sources to assist you in writing the paper, keeping notes of your sources, and writing a rough draft. As you write the rough draft, if you use any of the information from your sources word-for-word you must cite the source. If you read the information and write it in your own words and it is not common knowledge, then you must cite the source because you are paraphrasing someone’s information. After you complete your rough draft, you need to read it again and revise the paper into your final draft. Once you have the final draft complete, proofread the paper and submit it to your instructor. The research paper must have a minimum of a 5-7 body and include a cover page with your name, course number and title (HIST101 – American History to 1877), instructor’s name, and date. You must also include a bibliography at the end of your paper. The length requirement does not include your cover page or bibliography.

The Final Exam will be an open book, non-proctored exam that you complete during Week 8. The exam will consist of a choice of essay questions that will gauge your understanding of the readings and discussions from the course. The exam will require a written response of 4-5 pages in length and will be activated a week before the due date.

The assignment / course breakdown is as listed below --- it looks more complicated than it really is and gives you multiple chances to earn points, not just a few all or nothing assignments.

After successfully completing HIST 213, you should be able to:

CO-1: Analyze the contributions of generations of women to U.S history.

CO-2: Explain the influence of race, class, and region on women's life experiences

CO-3: Compare and contrast changes and continuities in the popular images of women and families from the colonial era to the present.

CO-4: Recall how women have exercised direct and indirect power in American society CO-5: Show the basis for reform movements that led to the evolution of women’s’ rights

CO-6: Illustrate the political and economic impact of industrialization on the lives of American women.

Book Title:A Companion to American Women's History, 1st ed. - e-book available in the APUS Online Library
ISBN:9780631212522
Publication Info:Wiley Lib
Author:Hewitt, Nancy
Unit Cost:$232.19
 
Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.*
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE
 

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.